Timothy Ho Chu-ting , who excels in both speed and freestyle skipping, became an icon of rope skipping in Hong Kong after his success at the Championships. Read the full story here.

scmpnews:

July 28, 2014 marks the centenary of the outbreak of WWI in Europe.
In a special report, the South China Morning Post traces their story from rural Shandong to the European war trenches and back through archive photos, eyewitness accounts, maps and news articles published in the Post at the time, when the Hong Kong paper was only a decade old.
(By Patrick Boehler & Cedric Sam)

This is an untold story beautifully written and produced by SCMP’s Patrick Boehler and assembled by Cedric Sam. 

livelymorgue:

April 7, 1983: For the 50th anniversary of the “King Kong” film, a 3,000-pound model was being hoisted onto the Empire State Building once again, but “with a blowout in an armpit” and other problems, the nylon replica ape was a laughingstock, or a disappointment, but not a terror, for millions of metropolitan area residents. Photo: Sara Krulwich/The New York Times

(via washingtonpost)

npr:

katiecouric:

Design can be a great tool for self-expression. Check out the history of interior design. (via Fast Company)

If you’ve got a few minutes of downtime, try playing with this awesome interactive infographic!

– Alexander

scmpnews:
Scholars in Macau warn of eroding academic freedom in the territory. Read the full story here.

scmpnews:

Scholars in Macau warn of eroding academic freedom in the territory. Read the full story here.

INFOGRAPHIC: Ding! Ding! The city’s historic trams serve Hong Kong 110 years

Known affectionately by their reassuringly familiar chime, the city’s historic trams have graced our frenetic thoroughfares since 1904. As they celebrate their 110th anniversary, the trams have remained as relevant as ever through constant modernisation, at the same time keeping fares affordable for all.

By SCMP’s Sarene Chan

INFOGRAPHIC: Why China is the real winner at the World Cup

While Germany beat Argentina in the World Cup final, the real winner is China. The country may not have sent a team to Brazil but its manufacturing might ensured China’s presence was felt at every level throughout the tournament.

SCMP cartoonist Harry Harrison’s view of the World Cup.